Posted on

Opening Exhibitions

Page-Walker Arts & History Center:

Sandy Teepen: What’s Your Favorite Color?

“The love of color, fabrics and textures have been the focus of my life as an artist. I have found a vehicle for color and design in my quilted collage pieces. My art quilts were created as visual treats using a contemporary approach to traditional quilt themes”.—Sandy Teepen  For more, http://sandieslabel.com/

Exhibition runs through Saturday, Mar 3

Artist Reception Friday, Jan 26 | 6-8 p.m.

Medium: Textiles

 

Brian Vines: Portraits

Brian Vines uses his keen draftsman skills to capture both character and detail in his portraits. The artist states: “People are the most interesting subject matter for me. I love being able to capture a likeness in pastel, oil, charcoal or pencil. It’s exciting to portray the essence of someone.” For more, www.designsbyvines.com

Exhibition runs through Saturday, Feb 3

Artist Reception Friday, Jan 26 | 6-8 p.m.

Medium: Various

 

 

Roni Liberman: Working with the Grain

 

Liberman creates turned wood for practical use as well as whimsy. The artist states “I work with many different woods, both domestic and exotic. In addition to turning the wood, I have enjoyed embellishing and decorating pieces with crushed semi-precious stone, carving and coloring.” For more, http://www.fearringtonartists.org/roni-liberman.html

Exhibition runs through Saturday, Feb 3

Artist Reception Friday, Jan 26 | 6-8 p.m.

Medium: Embellished Turned Wood

 

Cary Senior Center

Instructors ONLY

Have you ever wondered what our art instructors create on their own time?  Now is the time to see their talents and meet these teachers!  This exhibit is sure to impress while you decide which classes to take this Winter-Spring.

Exhibition runs through Friday, Feb 16

Artist Reception Friday, Jan 26 | 4-6 p.m.

Cary Arts Center

Shannon Johnstone: Landfill Dogs

These are not cute pictures of dogs. These are dogs who have been homeless for at least two weeks, and now face euthanasia if they do not find a home. “Each week I bring one dog from the county animal shelter and photograph him/her at Landfill Park, a former landfill converted into a public park.   The backdrop of Landfill Park is used for two reasons. First, the dogs will end up in a landfill if they do not find a home. They will be euthanized and their bodies will be buried deep in the landfill among our trash. Below the surface at Landfill Park there are more than 25,000 dogs buried. I think of this park as a burial ground. These photographs offer the last opportunity for these dogs to find homes.  This landscape offers a metaphor of hope. It is a place of trash that has been transformed into a place of beauty. I hope the viewer also sees the beauty in these homeless, unloved creatures.”

Exhibition runs through Sunday, Feb 18

Artist Reception Friday, Jan 26 | 6-8 p.m.

 

J.J. Raia: A Photographer’s Journey

A compilation of work resulting from over 25 years of photo adventures encompassing a diverse vision that continues to develop today. The exhibit will entail both color and black and white work, grand and intimate landscapes, natural abstractions, as well a few forays into uncharted territories. While concentrating on the artist’s most recent work, the show will also explore the full breadth of styles encountered along the journey from my earliest days in film, through my recent embrace of the digital photographic world.

Exhibition runs through Sunday, Feb 18

Artist Reception Friday, Jan 26 | 6-8 p.m.

 

Herbert C. Young Community Center

John W. Redfern: Beaches

Redfern has served as the official photographer for MLK, JR. DREAMFEST.  This local artist has received training at Saint Augustine’s College, Raleigh-Durham Art Institute, and life experiences.  This series of photographs capture the coastline during vacations past.

Exhibition runs through Sunday, Feb 18

Artist Reception Friday, Jan 26 | 6-8 p.m.